IBC FAQs

Does DOT Specification 57 Tank (IBC) have to be converted to UN Specification IBCs for hazardous product use?

Answer: CFR 49 § 173.32 (d) Use of Specification 52, 53, 56 and 57 portable tanks. Continued use of an existing portable tank constructed to DOT Specification 52 or 53 is authorized only for a tank constructed before June 1, 1972. Continued use of an existing portable tank constructed to DOT Specification 56 or 57 is authorized only for a tank constructed before October 1, 1996.

When should each IBC used for the transportation of a hazardous (regulated) material be successfully retested before further use?

Answer: Specification 57 portable tanks and UN31A portable tanks should be retested at least once every 2.5 years.

How do I know if my portable tank has a current test date?

Answer: The date of the most recent periodic retest must be marked on the tank, on or near the certification plate.

How do I document the retest date?

Answer: The owner of the tank or his authorized agent must retain a written record indicating the date and results of all required tests and the name/address of the tester, until the next retest has been satisfactorily completed and recorded.

What if the test date expires while the tank is filled with hazardous product and in warehouse storage?

Answer: A portable tank for which the retest or re-inspection has become due may not be filled and transported until retest or re-inspection has been successfully completed. This does not apply to any tank filled prior to the test due date.

What is the tare weight of an IBC?

Answer: Each IBC is weighed by the manufacturer and stamped on the certification plate on the IBC.

How high can I stack my stainless steel IBCs?

Answer: Do not exceed the maximum stacking load listed on the certification plate on the IBC.